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Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)
is good or bad about the current environment, we need to look not just at what we have lost or gamed compared to broadcast news but what we lost or gamed compared to the era of realism in the 19th century or the partisan press, in the late 18th century. or the progress receive era. so, we have really gone through these changes before, and the issue in front of us is not, is it good or bad? what's good about it, and what's bad, and how to maintain what is good and limit what is bad. >> host: let's go to the historical set of your book. what have we lost in this new era as opposed to the abc, nbc, cbs era. which is an era. >> guest: i think we lost significant things -- i should say lost -- you made the point that we have been talking about this for 20 years, we are style transitioning so those stations, those news networks still exist. but when we lived in an era, which we did in the '50s and ' 0s, and all the way up to the '90s where we as a society, wees a citizens, believed that if we watched the local news and then the national news, an hour or so period in the early evening, that
't help them along. they have been squeezed because of a tough environment. there is a big move into tablets and smartphones and all the competition weighs on intel, this type of company. talk about analyst calls. credit suisse cut the target. piper jaffray raised their target just to name a few. but they do have outperforms and neutrals. outperform came from credit suisse. back to you. melissa: nicole, thanks so much. ashley: washington, d.c. prepping for inauguration weekend. if you want a ultimate experience and don't we all, it will cost you a king's ransom. details are ahead. melissa: playing chicken with the energy industry literally. a new fight to shut down oil and wind production to save the prairie chicken. it is a chicken fight. ♪ . melissa: so is the prairie chicken versus the wind farm. the environmental battle heating up as the fish and wildlife service contemplates adding the bird to endangered species list. if that means shutting down vital wind farms and oil and gas facilities is it worth it. i understand the main problem is that these prairie chickens are afr
begins to impact on the environment and on people and so that's when you get into agricultural drought, to hydrological drought and there's another type of drought sometimes referred to which is the socioeconomic drought which is kind of a supply and demand thing. so there gets to be a lot of confusion sometimes between what is and agricultural drought and a hydrologic drought. in the minds of the public but i would also say in the minds of some researchers and scientists. >> roger you you live right there in colorado. quite a few months out of the year so you are in a state with -- if you wanted to make a comment on that? >> from the standpoint of the state of colorado, one of the things as other states as don has mentioned is the idea of linking the drought plan to the other planning mechanisms that are there. the links between the drought plan and the water resources plan in many cases are very tenuous. one of the few states that was trying to make a link between the long-term use of the aquifer and its drought plan that don and others help develop is -- as well. to speak in terms o
in the ecosystem. >> basically it's come to this. the environment where these pythons now live is not used to them. these creatures have evolved from places like the rainforest in southeast asia or the african savannah, and the habitat or the grassland habitat that you find in the everglades just simply is not equipped to deal with these very new and very invasive species. basically these pythons are invaders, and they are eating everything they come in contact with. >> you say these very new, are these pythons that were people's pets? >> likely that's how all of this originated. pot past 30 years people have been importing these snakes. a lot less lately. but during the 1970s and 1980s thousands and thousands of these snakes were brought in from asia and africa, and more often than not they either escaped because of hurricanes or people released them into environments where they shouldn't have, and these animals took over. they started out as pets, and then through negligence were released and, unfortunately, this ecosystem just really is not prepared to take on what these snakes do to the enviro
's done. >> sean: but dunn is wrong, it isn't a hostile environment and charlie rangel is wrong, lack of diversity-- and prominent liberals that work for obama they're making the claims out of thin air. >> i know many women, sean, i know many women there very satisfied and very happy and proud-- >> and thrown overboard in a moment when she could have used some support, but i won't mention names, isn't that true? >> she is, she is perhaps the-- >> and treated badly. >> and she was supported, she was supported. >> sean: should i name names? >> he she was supported by this president and able to do a fine job and delivering not only the reelection, but the ongoing-- >> sean, the president actually had to have a meeting of all the women in his white house, in his inner circle-- not the inner circle, but the white house when the complaints were overriding ap the president sat down with them and started meeting off looking at his watch and saying, are there really concerns here i need to know about? this president is completely dismissive. >> sean: why were women getting paid less then, penn
. >> reporter: still, some conservative christians say the focus shouldn't be on guns, but on the environment giving rise to this violence. >> instead of having as the nra proposes a policeman in every school. getting a dad in every home. >> reporter: vice president biden said he's glad that evangelical groups participated in his meetings because in the past, they have been reluctant to engage on the gun issue." athena jones, cnn, washington. >>> time for a little introduction. i want you to take a look here. this is my cat, browser. he's at home right now watching the show, no doubt. but he's pretty cute and cuddly. i spoil him rotten, but could he be plotting something sinister? could he be plotting to kill me? doesn't look like it there. we'll talk about it next with the author of "how to tell if your cat is trying to kill you." about health care... s i tuned it all out. with unitedhealthcare, i get information that matters... my individual health profile. not random statistics. they even reward me for addressing my health risks. so i'm doing fine... but she's still going to give me a
? that is a very rich interest level, in our current interest- rate environment. you have to wonder if the bank is not just holding on to your loan to maintain a high level of interest? but i wonder if this may be worth your while to try to go to another bank and not refinance with the same company. it has become a much more difficult circumstance to get a mortgage because the banks are still recovering from all of the bad loans that they made during the real-estate mania. >> one other issue that was brought up was the issue of debt-income ratio, and this is something richard spoke about and what he would do with the qualified loans. american hero joe says, what did he mean by 20% of the grossly month in come? explain this issue for us? >> this goes to the heart of the ability to repay the loan issue, that described a little bit ago. we don't want people taking on loans they cannot afford to repay, that leads us to problems. what they have decided is that 43% is the outside level, if your mortgage debt, plus or other debt, with car loans or consumer debt or credit cards, -- if your other obliga
into the international environment, which makes it more complex, but let me use that as a segue. we know and hear about economic impact repeatedly, but who speaks for the environment, and how can we keep that the boys drowned out as a difference for -- voice from being drowned out as a result of a difference of relationships? how do we close the cycle of latency and try to understand where we need information? >> let me start with a comment you made, which i found to be fascinating, that there is between a $11 and $30 for every dollar spent. an ounce of prevention is worth every cure. that is a 16 fold ratio. we know that. our policy has to put that in place. we need a baseline. of course we do. the only thing forcing the baseline is smart companies, and they may as well get a baseline, because they will show we started which dirty water, but there are no resources to get the baseline. we know we need to drill the northeast over the next couple days. -- decades. we need that baseline. we need it desperately, and we needed for human health as well. lots of different communities have different kinds of d
's different than an urban or city environment, isn't it? >> that wouldn't stop you from saying that hunters and n.r.a. members don't understand that there's a need for reasonable gun control legislation in the country. >> that's not what he said. what hank johnson said, they still can't get over that obama is black, that's what he said. that's race baiting. >> i agree with you, i agree with you, sean, i don't think it's legitimate argument to make and in his mind a lot of southerners-- 60% of white people didn't vote for obama and i think that the south that-- >> david limbaugh i'm tired of this country being led by the president, being divided along racial lines, rich versus poor, black versus white, old versus young. this president is the most divisive president in history and of course, we hear from his party almost daily now. and maybe they don't know the campaign's over. >> you know, hank johnson said he can't get over, we can't get over that he's black. i can't get over that he's a marxist, you know, this constant usage of liberals and obama of the race card is damaging race relations
use in the academic environment. as some of you know, three of our member publishers sued georgia state university because when georgia state moved its from printed course packs as materials for higher education courses to e-reserves, they made another change. they stopped paying a penny for anything put up on e-reserves no matter how, how long it was. and since 2006 not a penny has been paid. and because georgia state was, in the view of publishers, an outlier in that respect because we have understood and we think many people have understood that copyright is agnostic or same rules would apply whether we're talking print or digital, that's what led to this particular litigation. and i would say that there this -- we know there's all this vagueness and difficult any the deciding what is fair use. and you can run through four factors, but the bottom line, this is hard to figure out in many cases. but some cases are clearer than others. in the cases where large amounts of material are being used semester after semester after semester not paid for if any amount no matter how long th
? >> this is a different environment than it was four years ago, craig and a couple of points. president bush does come into a success term in the strong political position. his approval readings is 52% and the second-term agenda items like gun control as well as immigration and you mentioned those attitudes about the direction of the country and about the economy and this is an american public right now that lowered its standards and lowered its expectations from four years ago. in some ways that's a good situation from the obama white house and sometimes lower expectations make it easier to get achievements done, but this is a country that is still being hit by the aftereffects of the great recession and also this poll comes after the terrible tragic shooting as well as the showdown in the new year. >> we polled folks when they were already pretty down. >> let me ask you about the war in iraq. president obama's political prominence first propelled by his opposition to the war. what did we find in the poll with regards to the war in iraq? >> it was fascinating, a number we had. 51% the iraq war wasn't
. i think it's fermented a -- you know, an environment that's become increasingly uncivil. >> all right. we have exhausted this subject. i want to move on quickly and i don't have a lot of time. i want to talk about you said the president seemed antagonistic and other people say the president is more confident now and has really come into his own in the second term. she said antagonistic. do you see antagonistic or more confident now? >> i think there's some big things the country has to do for gun reform, for example. big things that the president -- he has to do. he has to be strong and show leadership to get these things done. you know, republicans are ready to come out and say they don't want to have anything to do with it. so as a leader, he's got to sort of pull together the country, go to the people, organize and get this thing done. he can't wait for congress to -- wait for congress to do it. he's got to try to get as much done as he possibly can. >> i think he's both things, more confident and maybe more antagonistic. maybe more antagonistic because he is more confident.
the aerial spraying, fumigation, we destroyed millions of acres of coca and rain forest environment. one of the most by a diverse countries and the world, literally scorching the years. but what are politicians don't talk about is that colombia is bigger than texas and california combined. the same is true bolivia and peru. a very large land masses. trying to eradicate is like trying to wage a war on dandelions in the united states. good luck. it's not possible. nonetheless, after 12 years of spraying and just merciless onslaught of eradication, 12 years ago 90 percent of cocaine in the united states originated from columbia. after a dozen years of intense drug war in colombia, today about 95 percent of u.s. cocaine originates from columbia. whereas less than 1 percent originally from bolivia. oblivion's actually have done much better in terms of eradication, interdiction of cocaine transiting through peru to brazil and argentina and other countries. also, they have captured and seized more of that than previous governments that were very subservient to u.s. interest. so by any objective
, honoring the nation's veterans, the environment, and another one is economic development. randi? >> shannon travis, thank you very much for the update from there. and now some news outside the beltway. notre dame linebacker manti t'eo spoke to espn last night. it's his first interviewer since he was swept up in the controversy over a fake online girlfriend. now in that interviewer, he denied having any part in the fake girlfriend story except being the victim of a cruel hoax. te'o spoke with espn off camera about the whole ordeal. >> i could say that in the entire 2 1/2 hours we spoke, he was completely composed, self-assured. he betrayed no nervousness. he had maybe full command of the story suggests that it's a story rather than the truth. but he -- he had a full command of everything that i posed. >> and of course te'o told a man that -- a man named ronaiah tuiasosopo admitted to being behind the hoax. he showed them a tweet supposedly an apology from ronaiah tuiasosopo. cnn hasn't confirmed the tweet or the man's involvement. we went to his home actually in california, but the person th
many things foraenergy and the environment. i know that a lot were included in the economic stimulus bill. host: is president of? making fewer promises that he was initially? -- is president obama making fewer promises than initially? guest: absolutely. the 2012 campaign was a campaign of attacks. when we look back at the moments of the campaign, as you look at the debates and what they were saying on the campaign trail of what they were saying in commercials, they spent so much of the time attacking each other. relatively little laying out their agenda in any detail. this was one of the hardest to fact check. mitt romney did not provide details about the tax plan. obama spent some time attacking mitt romney that there were just some many fewer promises made. there was less of an agenda. host:the score coard looks at 500 promises made by obama. he has made progress on 73% of them. thank you for being here. that website is politifact.com. >> tomorrow, cheryl olson talks about violent video game and the effect on young people. john lott talked about the obama administration's efforts
a catastrophic event and when these things happen, you need to look at policy and adapt to the environment. the important thing is to find a couple of items and be for it rather than saying we are against everything. backing the nra position which is more guns in schools. that is not a republican position. that would cost $5 billion to do. >> par do get republican support here on back ground checks. 87% of democrats and a lot of republicans support that. a lot on news controls and 38% democrats. you go beyond that and almost every other issue and the assault weapons ban. the semi automatic weapons and sales on the clips. a minority of republicans support all those issues. >> the items listed on that list and things that the republicans are talking about. they have nothing to do with the second amendment and my point is don't wait for the democrats to come out and respond to it. they have a republican plan and we both live on planet earth here. >> politically speaking, what would happen. >> the republican from texas stands up and said okay, let's support these gun control issues. >> i think
that schools are structured environment and frankly, little girl's behavior, a willingness to sit still, pay attention, not necessarily to talk and get up and run around the room is more conducive to a classroom setting. what we've done, trying to turn little boys into different forms of little girls and a lot has to do with the way that schools are structured. you take a six-year-old and sit him in a chair and expect that they're going to stay there. it isn't natural, frankly, it isn't natural for a lot of little girls, it's more for the convenience of teachers than it is accommodating to the child's needs. >> that's truly right. little boys are savages, i don't mean that in-- it's just true. >> we can't change it, but thr he' lovable and grow up to warm, wonderful human beings when they get a little older. >> tucker: amen. on that hopeful note. coming up, get an instant mood boost from botox. true, that story coming up and women all around put it on every day, but one woman gave herself a no makeup challenge for a year, claims it made her more beautiful. is this a good lesson in vanity for
to keep control. he had to control the environment. he had to control the situation. and that, again, is so similar to madoff. >> sports is filled with cheating and everybody knows it, but there is an aspect of this story that oprah asked lance armstrong which is about in order to cover up, he told a lot of lies. that included emma o'reilly, armstrong's former masseuse. she said lance, quote, tried to make her life a living hell after she went public with some of the details of his doping operation. >> what do you want to say about emma o'reilly? >> hey, she -- she's one of these people that i have to apologize to. >> mm-hmm. >> she's one of these people that got run over, got bullied. >> yeah. isn't she -- you sued her. >> to be honest, oprah, we sued so many people, i'm sure we did. >> you're suing people and you know that they're telling the truth. what is that? >> it's -- it's a major flaw, and it's a guy who expected to get whatever he wanted and to control every outcome. it's inexcusable. and that's -- when i say that there are people that will hear this and will never forgive
despite the fact they are working in this pernicious environment in washington. >> speaking of john boehner here, is another clip from inside obama's presidency with john boehner. >> dealing with the white house as i'm dealing with a bowl of -- like dealing with a bowl of jelge jello. they refuse to make tougher choices facing entitlement reform. that's the bottom line we are heading into the weekend with the best opportunity for preventing economic cataclysm on a global level from occurring it is now gone. there is month deal. >> it seems like barack obama and john boehner could do well to spend a couple hundred dollars and hire professional mediator. >> you know, it is probably something, as you know, much larger, much more proceed pound than that with implications, i'm now making a film about the fiscal cliff and the debt ceiling that -- that will air in about a month. you know the scary thing about it, you guys, is the idea there may be government month by month as they pass resolutions and as this -- struggle continues. both sides really hunkering down, i think, for something t
's the agenda. >> one what are the things you think you can do in this environment? by the way, i talked to bankers who say, you know what, i don't know if anyone's going to trust us. first of all i'm not sure anyone did historically trusted banks. >> agreed. >> and that it may never get that much better until, frankly, the economy gets better and the unemployment picture gets better. >> i would sake exception with never. i think there have been times in the past when the banker was your friend. you knew you could go down and get a loan if you needed to buy a house. you didn't worry about whether you could qualify. you worried about, you know, what house you wanted to buy. those are the types we need to get back. to frankly, banking's only one part of the financial services industry. this is a very broad, very wide industry. markets are driven based on people's confidence in their future, their willingness to invest in something they think has a better future than the current times. so earning that confidence. you know, financial advisers in our industry, professionals who work with indi
a period of time begins to impact on the environment and on people. and so that's when you get into agricultural drought, hydrologic drought, and there's another type of drought sometimes referred to which is more socioeconomic drought, which is kind of a supply and demand thing, so there gets to be a lot of confusion sometimes between what is an agricultural drought and what is at hydrologic drought. in the minds of the public eye which is a also in the minds of some researchers and scientists speed roger, you live right there in colorado, quite a few months out of the year so you in a state that's got the perfect case study. i think he wanted to make a comment on that? >> so from the standpoint of the state of colorado, one of the things, and other states that don has mentioned them is the idea of linking the drought plan to the other planning mechanis mechanisms. the links between the drought plan and the water resources plan in many cases are very tenuous. one of the few states that's actually trying to make a link between long-term use of the aquifer and its drought plan,
to help 8000 schools to train teachers and staff to create safer environments. when it comes to mental health, more money, provided $55 million for new initiative to make sure students get mental treatment. $25 million for state base strategies supporting individuals age 16-25 with mental health or substance abuse issues. another $25 million to offer students mental-health services for trauma or anxiety. $50 million to train 5000 additional mental health professionals serving children and young adults. those are the items the washington post as identified that congressional action would be necessary. as we go throughout the morning, a lot of editorials from this morning's papers. we were reports of those as well. we take your calls and get your thoughts, jeff is a gun owner from missouri. thank you for holding. go ahead. caller: the sun is just coming up here, and it has been up for you a little bit. i wanted to address the. a lot of people -- the point a lot of people forget. the second amendment was put into place to protect people from being observed by a corrupt government. if we d
proposals. almostin today's environment whe revenue is scarce -- the more we push that back, that has a really high revenue loss figure. there is a lot of things we need to do to really help americans saved that will cost us tax revenue today that will really give us a better america in the future. we need to start thinking about that. we probably -- we talk about the american dream -- 3/4 of americans told us that they found that losing traditional pensions like when you worked at an employer and they gave you an income for the rest of your life, losing that has put the american dream at risk for 3/4 of the american people. we need to think about how we find ways to get more people saving more money and having features that look like retirement plans that give them a guaranteed paycheck. when you retire, you don't want to necessarily get a bucket of money. you need to have a paycheck to replace the paycheck you will lose. host: a viewer asks -- guest: if you are disabled or if you die, you can take the money without a penalty. death and disability -- sometimes congress has made up a
the japanese planes will be flying again. it is an extremely confusing environment if you have one set of airlines saying they are grounding and another set of airlines saying they are still flying them. >> how disruptive is this for travelers? >> by and large, almost nonexistent. the airlines will swap in some -- jal and ana have canceled some flights, swapped in other aircraft, absolutely minimal. not at the moment an issue of disruption. >> richard quest, thank you. >>> so three months all alone at sea. coming up, we catch up with one of the most determined competitors we have ever met racing around the world all by himself. in a sailboat. ♪ using cloud computing and mobile technology, verizon innovators have developed a projective display for firefighters. allowing them to see through anything. because the world's biggest challenges deserve even bigger solutions. powerful answers. verizon. ya. alright, another one just like that. right in the old bucket. good toss! see that's much better! that was good. you had your shoulder pointed, you kept your eyes on your target. let's do it
proportionally because it was a real working-class environment which i grew up. so you didn't have mounds of food on your plate. and there were no snacks in our house. we didn't have potato chips or cookies. my mother would bake cookies once a week and then you'd have them as a treat. it was a whole different eating plan even though we were knocking back cokes all day long. >> with all due respect, i've heard this from joe, that's great that you ran all day. wonderful. that about the kids over the past 10, 20, 30 years who drank five cokes a day and didn't do that. >> is that coke's fault? that's the question. >> actually, it's part of a bigger problem just like the gun debate, okay? >> look, i have friends at coca-cola and friends at most of the soft drink companies. i think you've got to give them credit for at least putting this out there and saying obesity is an issue in america, and calories do count, and we're now talking about it as a result of them doing that. and it probably will generate some kind of a dialogue. >> i'll give them credit skeptically because i think they're covering thems
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)